Lean Training & Seminars

  • Overview

    A lean enterprise views itself as part of an extended value chain, focusing on the elimination of waste between the participant and the participant suppliers, and the participant and the participant customers. Lean has it origins in the teaching and writings of TQM and JIT, which espouse the idea of "delighting the customer through a continuous stream of value adding activities". Specifically, it is an extension of the phrase "world class" as define by Dr. Richard Schonberger as
    "… adhering to the highest standards of business performance as measured by the customer."

    In other words, value is always defined from the customer's perspective. Understanding the participant's customer's needs is a prerequisite for driving Lean principles and methodologies. A commonly held definition of Lean Enterprise is "a group of individuals, functions, and sometimes legally separate but operationally synchronized organizations."

    The 'value stream' defines the Lean Enterprise. The objectives of the Lean Enterprise are to:

    • Correctly identify and specify 'value to the ultimate customer / consumer' in all its products and services
    • Analyze and focus the value stream so that it does everything from product development and production to sales and service in a way that activities that do not create value are removed and actions that do create value proceed in a continuous flow as pulled by the customer.

    From the time a customer need is recognized until it is satisfied, the process and all its elements must add value for the 'value stream' to be meaningful. The basic components of this Lean system are waste elimination, continuous flow, and customer pull.

    As defined by John Krafcik, in his book, The Machine that Changed the World
    "Lean production is 'lean' because it uses less of everything compared with mass production: half the human effort in the factory, half the factory space, half the investment in tools, half the engineering hours to develop a new product in half the time. Also, it requires far less than half of the needed inventory on site. The expected results are fewer defects, while producing a greater and ever growing variety of products."

    Lean applies to any organizational type and can be applied to all areas within the business. Essentially, Lean is a three-pronged approach incorporating A Quality Belief, Waste Elimination and Employee Involvement supported by a Structured Management System. Basically, we've taken simple processes and complicated them resulting in longer lead-times, reduced flexibility, increased inventories and the inability to meet customer demands. Lean management principles have been used effectively in manufacturing companies for decades, particularly in Japan. AFT SYSTEMS, INC. believes that lean principles can be - indeed, already are being - successfully applied to the delivery of health care.

    Lean thinking begins with driving out waste so that all work adds value and serves the customer's needs. Identifying value-added and non-value-added steps in every process is the beginning of the journey toward lean operations.

    In order for lean principles to take root, leaders must first work to create an organizational culture that is receptive to lean thinking. The commitment to lean must start at the very top of the organization, and all staff should be involved in helping to redesign processes to improve flow and reduce waste.

    Although health care differs in many ways from manufacturing, there are also surprising similarities: Whether building a car or providing health care for a patient, workers must rely on multiple, complex processes to accomplish their tasks and provide value to the customer or patient. Waste - of money, time, supplies, or good will - decreases value.

  • Lean White Belt

    This class introduces you to the tools and techniques for implementing lean principles. Participants will gain a broad understanding of the philosophy, methods and benefits of lean and value stream mapping as they apply to all types of enterprises. The concepts are introduced via hands-on exercises.

    Topic Highlights:
    • Cellular flow
    • 5S
    • SMED
    • Value stream mapping
    • Waste reduction
    Training Objectives:
    • Identify and eliminate waste within operations
    • Interpret a value stream map
    • Manage a lean process transformation
    Course Content
    • Introduction
    • Waste
    • 55
    • Value Added
    • Value Stream
    • Value Stream Mapping
    • Mudha

  • Lean Green Belt

    This three-day course provides an in-depth understanding of lean enterprise principles and how to apply them within your organization. Your lean journey begins with a series of interactive simulations that demonstrate how each lean concept is applied and its impact on the process. Mapping the process flow and identifying the activities that add value from the customer's perspective is the cornerstone of this class. The class is then given a scenario and the students simulate the conversion from traditional to lean in a practical hands-on environment. The course also provides a structure for how to manage a lean process for continuous improvement within the healthcare environment. Participants will learn how to structure their organizations to support and continuously improve a lean process. Participants will also fully understand how to implement 5S within their plants and how to begin reducing setup time using the SMED process.

    Topic Highlights:
    • 5S and muda
    • Point of use
    • Pull
    • SMED
    • Value-added
    • Value stream mapping
    • 7 Wastes
    • Visual Workplace
    Training Objectives:
    • Create and improve a lean process
    • Implement 5S to develop a safe, clean working environment
    • Map the process flow and identify activities that add value
    • Applying the SMED process
    Course Content
    • Flow: Establishing one-piece flow across the value-adding activities
    • Point-Of-Use: Using workplace organization and equipment setup reduction techniques to enable flow by having all equipment and materials readily accessible
    • Pull: Providing a method for continuously replenishing materials as they are consumed by customer demand
    • Built-in Quality: Continuously improving each step of the production process to eliminate variation and to pursue the goal of perfect product and process quality
    • Build to Demand: Learn to produce only to actual customer demand

  • Lean Black Belt

    Lean applies to any organizational type and can be applied to all areas within the business. Essentially, Lean is a three-pronged approach incorporating A Quality Belief, Waste Elimination and Employee Involvement supported by a Structured Management System. Basically, we've taken simple processes and complicated them resulting in longer lead-times, reduced flexibility, increased inventories and the inability to meet customer demands.

    Learn how to execute a prioritized action plan to institutionalize continuous improvement in your organization. This course is designed to prepare you for implementing lean across the enterprise.

    Overview:

    This course is designed to prepare the black belt or "master practitioner" for implementing lean across the enterprise. It is highly recommended that the course participant have a Lean Green Belt or equivalent. The course will lay the groundwork for building a lean enterprise transformation by portraying the entire spectrum of a lean transformation from traditional processes to a lean product delivery system. By the end of this course, participants will be able to answer these questions:

    1. How do the steps of the lean enterprise fit together?
    2. How does a lean "black belt" provide direction and vision toward a corporate lean effort?
    3. How does a lean "black belt" apply the principles of lean across the enterprise?
    4. This 5 day program requires participants to submit a project for evaluation. Participants who successfully complete the project and pass an online exam will receive AFT SYSTEMS, INC.'s Lean Black Belt.

    Topic Highlights:
    • Hands-on simulation
    • Inventory strategies
    • Lean as a business strategy
    • Lean as a component of strategy
    • Lean planning
    • Supplier integration
    • Configure to demand: How to move toward a multitiered product delivery system
    • Process flow: How to establish flow and how to make it lean using lean process design techniques such as pull, point of use and visual controls Pull from customer through supply: How to reduce customer wait times and increase customer satisfaction dramatically
    • Rate-based planning: How to plan the resources necessary for operating in a lean environment
    Training Objectives:
    • Accomplish supplier and logistics integration
    • Complete a lean enterprise transformation
    • Develop a multi-tiered product delivery system
    • Identify the components of a lean process
    • Integrate rate-based planning and scheduling
    • Configure to demand
    • Develop lean process flows
    • Implement lean in your organization
    • Reduce cycle time through minimizing wait times

    Course Content
    • Planning Required to Complete a Lean Enterprise Transformation
    • Performing a Business Strategy and Aligning Your Customers' Requirements with Your Company's Business Goals
    • Configuring Products and Services and Developing a Multitier Product Delivery System
    • Identifying the Components Of a Lean Process
      • Flow
      • Point of Use
      • Pull
      • Quality
      • Takt
    • Integrating Rate based Planning and Scheduling
    • Implementing Finished Goods Inventory Strategies And Customer Integration
    • Accomplishing Supplier and Logistics Integration and Supplier Pull/ Broadcast
    • Articulating and Executing a Prioritized Action Plan to Institutionalize Continual Improvement in Your Organization and Be a Positive Statistic of Continual Improvement
     
    • Go 'Configure to Demand'- A look at how to move toward a multitiered product delivery system using:
      • Product Configuration
      • Planning Bills of Materials
      • Product Delivery System Integration Techniques
    • Learn the Process Flow- A look at how to establish flow and how to make it lean using lean process design techniques:
      • Baseline Process
      • Product Anatomy
      • Process Anatomy
      • Activity Level Data Collection
      • Lean Design
      • Data Analysis
      • New Process Design (Flow, Point of Use, Pull, Quality, Takt)
      • Lean Tools (e.g. Point of Use and Visual Controls)
     
    • Rate-based Planning- A look at how to plan the resources necessary for operating in a lean environment using:
      • Schedule Cycle and Footprint
      • Mix Model Sequencing
      • Sequencing and Pacing Box
      • Capacity Planning and Response Profiles
    • Pull from Customer Through Supply- A look at how to reduce customer waiting time significantly and increase customer satisfaction using:
      • Finished Goods Inventory Strategies
      • Point of Sale Data
      • Production Planning
      • Material Control
      • Kanban